Deficit Reduction Committee Unable to Reach Agreement, but Impasse Is Not Necessarily Failure

By jschneidewind on November 21, 2011 in Policy/Advocacy, Uncategorized

by Ronald Johnson, Vice President of Policy and Advocacy

The Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction, widely known as the “super committee,” was unable to reach an agreement on a plan to reduce the federal deficit by at least $1.2 trillion over 10 years.  The 12-member committee was created by the Budget Control Act of 2011 (BCA) and charged with developing such a proposal.  The BCA mandates that if neither super committee nor Congress is able to reach an agreement, then automatic spending cuts will be enacted to meet the minimum goal of $1.2 trillion in deficit reduction.

The notion of “failure” has been bandied about heavily in the public commentary about the super committee’s impasse. AIDS United does not see the committee’s work as failure.  We commend those committee members who stood firm against accepting draconian spending cuts and against proposals that essentially would have gutted Medicaid and Medicare.  We applaud those members who insisted that an agreement needed to be fair and balanced and include meaningful revenue growth and expecting the wealthiest people in the country to share in the sacrifice needed to make a sizable reduction in the federal deficit.  We are grateful for the strong advocacy that called for protecting health care and safety net programs serving vulnerable populations.  Protecting the vast majority of people living in America, including people living with HIV/AIDS and other chronic diseases, is not “failure.”  It is what the Constitution calls promoting the “general Welfare.”

There is no question that the automatic spending cuts that will now be triggered, on top of the nearly $1 trillion in cuts already enacted under the BCA and cuts made in Fiscal Year 2011, will hurt.  The BCA itself was the result of a misguided yearlong focus on deficit reduction rather than on job growth and further efforts to stimulate the economy.  This distraction has been harmful.  It is never good to have to choose between “a rock and a hard place,” but in the closing days of the super committee’s deliberations, it became clear to many health care and social justice advocates that no deal was better than a bad deal.

The automatic cuts that will go into effect starting in January 2013 will now come under increased attention.  The law says that 50% of the cuts must be from the “national defense” area.  Even while the super committee was still trying to reach an agreement, some senators spoke about changing the law to protect military and defense spending.  Doing so would shift all deficit reduction efforts to non-defense spending, which includes spending on health care measures and the majority of spending for HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, and research programs.  For that reason, AIDS United calls on everyone to oppose provisions that would exempt defense spending from the automatic cuts or lessen the severity of defense cuts without similar protections for non-defense spending.   AIDS United continues to call for balanced revenue measures that would reduce the need for spending cuts generally.

Again, let’s move on from the chatter about the super committee being a failure.  Let’s focus on real policy change that protects vital, life saving programs and achieves a balanced approach that shifts the focus to growing jobs and reviving the economy.  That’s the better financial approach needed to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic in America.

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