World AIDS Day in Detroit – Getting to Zero by Facing AIDS

By MWally on December 20, 2011 in AIDS at 30, AmeriCorps, HIV/AIDS Awareness Days, World AIDS Day

World AIDS Day in Detroit is a day that does not pass without recognition. Community events are found not just within the city, but across the state at universities, health departments and at the agencies where our AIDS United AmeriCorps m members serve. This year a new event looked to honor those efforts in a collaborative event that not only set high standards for the future but reinforced our ties with the past. World AIDS Day Detroit (WADD) set out with the goal of raising awareness, battling stigma and remembering where we have been. “Zero new infections, Zero AIDS-related deaths, Zero discrimination.” Getting to zero, a goal that sets the bar high yet seems to make sense and a goal that Team Detroit looks to back each and every day we head out to service.

Collaboration is strength. Organizers of World AIDS Day Detroit understood and capitalized on this fact. Wayne State University School of Medicine, The Hemophilia Foundation of Michigan, The World Federation of Hemophilia, community based organizations such as AIDS Partnership Michigan, Affirmations and Michigan AIDS Coalition and others from across the city of Detroit combined efforts and embarked on what became a truly remarkable event. Major highlights of the day included speaker Jeanne White-Ginder (the mother of Ryan White), the gathering of south east Michigan mayors and officials in an effort to educate and address issues surrounding HIV/AIDS, the screening of the documentary “Bad Blood,” and a NoH8 photo shoot. Members of the community flocked to the event and partner activities across the state were publicized through WADD as it acted as a hub for World AIDS Day information.

Team Detroit’s role in this event focused on facing stigma by joining in the efforts of AIDS.gov and its campaign “Facing AIDS.” The campaign addresses stigma and promotes HIV testing by “putting a face on AIDS.” Individuals or groups take a picture while holding up a sign stating how or why they are Facing AIDS; the photos are then highlighted on AIDS.gov with others from across the country. Our shoot was popular amongst the array of activities at the event and the emotions behind the messages show the strength and resolve of those battling HIV. From those in the new generation inheriting the fight, to the veterans who already left their mark and look to see it out to the end, to the people we serve in our community who depend on us, all of their messages give meaning to why we do what we do.

“I am Facing AIDS because of all the friends and clients I have lost.”

“We are Facing AIDS so nobody else has to surrender their loved ones to this disease.”

“We are Facing AIDS to build a stronger community.”

Messages like these are often drowned out by stigma’s shout. We must highlight the good in what we do, in who we work with and in why we do it. Allowing these thoughts, feelings and aspirations to go without mention is to allow defeat. The day we allow stigma to overtake our efforts is the day we all lose. The Facing AIDS campaign has grown over the years and Team Detroit was proud to once again take part and allow the community we serve and those we work with each day to have a voice and spread their message of hope and perseverance.

For more info on World AIDS Day Detroit – http://www.worldaidsdaydetroit.com/

Don’t forget to finds us online:

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/TeamDetroit

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