Witness to History (Again): Inauguration 2013

By Melissa Donze on January 25, 2013 in Elections 2012, Policy/Advocacy, Uncategorized

head shot, Melissa

By Melissa Donze, Zamora Fellow, AIDS United

Six hours of freezing cold temperatures; six hours of standing in the same place, watching the sun rise over the Capitol; six hours of waiting to hear a single person speak; and it was worth every single second.

Four years ago, I drove to Washington, D.C., with some of my college friends so I could be witness to the historic inauguration of the man who renewed my hope in the collective power of individuals. Being a part of President Obama’s first inauguration is one of my most treasured memories; for the first time in my life, I was part of something bigger than myself, something that we have only begun to understand within the context of history.

Four years later, I found myself in D.C. again, this time as a resident and an advocate for people living with HIV. When the opportunity to attend President Obama’s second inauguration presented itself, I couldn’t say no; I wanted to be a part of history again. This time, the crowd looked different. It was smaller, but hopeful; enthusiastic, but resilient. The past four years had changed all of us in one way or another. I was older, and maybe a little bit wiser. I went abroad and returned home with an altered perspective of the world every time. I graduated from college and got my first taste of the “real world.”

I wasn’t the only one who had changed. President Obama was noticeably greyer this time. Realistic expectations and principles had replaced the unbridled idealism of four years ago. The most noticeable changes, however, were found in his inaugural address. While his first inaugural address was good, it was full of lofty messages and metaphorical abstractions that could have been applied to any time period. This second address, however, was grounded in our time and the struggles we face today. It was guided by the principles of our founding documents and still managed to be forward-moving and progressive. Its premise of equality, the most evident of truths, allowed him to address fair wages for women, gay marriage, voter suppression, immigration, and second amendment controversies. Although he did not directly mention HIV, his address spoke to many of the issues people living with HIV face.

As I stood there and listened to President Obama say the words “Stonewall” and “Newtown,” among many others, my eyes filled with tears. I am so proud that the President will be leading us down the path to ensuring life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness for all Americans. It truly feels to me like we are now on the path to equality.

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