Browsing Category: HIV/AIDS Awareness Days

World AIDS Day 2011 in Tulsa, OK

OttWorld AIDS Day was certainly a long one this year, as there were two events going on in Tulsa. Instead of picking one, Team Tulsa decided to do them both! First we attended Tulsa CARES’ annual World AIDS Day Symposium. Tulsa CARES is an HIV/AIDS organization that works with HIV-positive people living in poverty. Then we went to Tulsa’s World AIDS Day program and premiere of “We Were Here,” a documentary about the early days of AIDS epidemic in San Francisco and how the city responded.

At the symposium, we learned about issues from a wide variety of sources facing people living with HIV/AIDS  in Tulsa . The first presenter, Jim Ott, talked to us about the “rush to judgment” that we fight against in our work with HIV. Then we had a panel of health experts talk about current and promising medical advances, including new drugs and trials. It was very informative, especially hearing from our HIV-positive audience members and learning their health concerns.

harrisonAfter lunch, Dr. Timothy Harrison from the  US Department of Health and Human Services explained how the National HIV/AIDS Strategy was created and how it would affect Oklahoma. Christopher Grano from the Northern Colorado AIDS Project talked to us about taking stigma out of our prevention materials. Instead of using scare tactics that make people living with HIV seem evil, negligent, or dangerous, he wants us to put people first and have sex-positive prevention materials that focus on good behaviors (getting tested, wearing condoms, not discriminating against people with HIV, etc). Our last presenter asked us to be mindful of the ethics in how we share information about clients with other agencies. Even though sharing might be legal through releases or lack of laws, it might not be ethical. The whole program helped us professionally and personally and was a good reminder that we have the information and medications to end AIDS.

At the candlelight vigil, we had a chance to remember our co-workers, clients, and friends with HIV who have passed. Then we went inside the independent movie theater to listen to stories from Tulsa’s early response to the HIV epidemic. We had a lot of former AmeriCorps site supervisors and an AmeriCorps member from the first team talk about their experiences at the beginning of the epidemic and their hopes for the future. There were lots of people dying in Oklahoma at the beginning, and Ric Harrison, a former AmeriCorps member, was a part of a VNA hospice group that help ease the passing of Tulsans with AIDS. Janice Nicklas, our city supervisor, talked about founding TCAP, Tulsa Community AIDS Project, and Tulsa CARES. It was good for the AmeriCorps team to hear these stories of the beginning of the epidemic since none of us had been born during that time. Hearing all the stories and hopes for the future made us feel more committed to the cause. We’ve come a long way since the beginning of the epidemic, but there’s still a lot more to do!

Team NOLA on World AIDS Day 2011

Throughout the week of Dec. 1, 2011, New Orleans joined other cities around the world in observing World AIDS Day– a time of remembrance and awareness.

On Nov. 30, Team NOLA volunteered at a screening of “The Other City”– a documentary about the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Washington, D.C. Donations were collected at the door to support a project to make HIV Awareness license plates for Louisiana. Team NOLA helped to promote, set-up, run, and break-down the event.

On Dec. 1, Team NOLA participated in the Facing AIDS project. We walked around parts of New Orleans, asking people if they would like to have their pictures taken with a message about how they are Facing AIDS. We were pleasantly surprised by how many people agreed.

The first part of our mobile photo shoot took place in the French Quarter. Next we went to the AIDS memorial in Washington Square Park where the Louisiana Office of Public Health does a wreath-laying ceremony every year. The last part of our photo shoot took place in the Marigny neighborhood of New Orleans.

We took pictures of ordinary citizens as well as people who have been involved in the fight against HIV/AIDS for many years. Everyone was given red ribbons and a flyer with our facebook page where they could access their photo later.

At night, at the request of the Office of Public Health, the lights on the Superdome were red in honor of World AIDS Day.

For other behind-the-scene shots, check out our facebook album!

World AIDS Day in Detroit – Getting to Zero by Facing AIDS

World AIDS Day in Detroit is a day that does not pass without recognition. Community events are found not just within the city, but across the state at universities, health departments and at the agencies where our AIDS United AmeriCorps m members serve. This year a new event looked to honor those efforts in a collaborative event that not only set high standards for the future but reinforced our ties with the past. World AIDS Day Detroit (WADD) set out with the goal of raising awareness, battling stigma and remembering where we have been. “Zero new infections, Zero AIDS-related deaths, Zero discrimination.” Getting to zero, a goal that sets the bar high yet seems to make sense and a goal that Team Detroit looks to back each and every day we head out to service.

Collaboration is strength. Organizers of World AIDS Day Detroit understood and capitalized on this fact. Wayne State University School of Medicine, The Hemophilia Foundation of Michigan, The World Federation of Hemophilia, community based organizations such as AIDS Partnership Michigan, Affirmations and Michigan AIDS Coalition and others from across the city of Detroit combined efforts and embarked on what became a truly remarkable event. Major highlights of the day included speaker Jeanne White-Ginder (the mother of Ryan White), the gathering of south east Michigan mayors and officials in an effort to educate and address issues surrounding HIV/AIDS, the screening of the documentary “Bad Blood,” and a NoH8 photo shoot. Members of the community flocked to the event and partner activities across the state were publicized through WADD as it acted as a hub for World AIDS Day information.

Team Detroit’s role in this event focused on facing stigma by joining in the efforts of AIDS.gov and its campaign “Facing AIDS.” The campaign addresses stigma and promotes HIV testing by “putting a face on AIDS.” Individuals or groups take a picture while holding up a sign stating how or why they are Facing AIDS; the photos are then highlighted on AIDS.gov with others from across the country. Our shoot was popular amongst the array of activities at the event and the emotions behind the messages show the strength and resolve of those battling HIV. From those in the new generation inheriting the fight, to the veterans who already left their mark and look to see it out to the end, to the people we serve in our community who depend on us, all of their messages give meaning to why we do what we do.

“I am Facing AIDS because of all the friends and clients I have lost.”

“We are Facing AIDS so nobody else has to surrender their loved ones to this disease.”

“We are Facing AIDS to build a stronger community.”

Messages like these are often drowned out by stigma’s shout. We must highlight the good in what we do, in who we work with and in why we do it. Allowing these thoughts, feelings and aspirations to go without mention is to allow defeat. The day we allow stigma to overtake our efforts is the day we all lose. The Facing AIDS campaign has grown over the years and Team Detroit was proud to once again take part and allow the community we serve and those we work with each day to have a voice and spread their message of hope and perseverance.

For more info on World AIDS Day Detroit – http://www.worldaidsdaydetroit.com/

Don’t forget to finds us online:

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/TeamDetroit

This Is What We Can Do – Team Detroit’s Fast Start

The service year in Detroit started with the gathering of all eight AIDS United AmeriCorps teams in Ann Arbor, Michigan. This awesome meeting set the tone for what looks to be an exciting year. It was at this pre-service meeting that teams began to truly form and create bonds. The team building that took place also allowed individuals to grow, with each person having to push him or herself at one point or another (whether it was during the ice-breakers, the condom demonstrations or at Crossroads Adventure Center). Team Detroit left the meeting excited and jumped right into our service year.

9/11 Day of Service

Our first Team 5th Day came in response to President Obama’s call for a day of service in remembrance of 9/11. We took part in one of the largest 9/11 service day events in the nation. The event,  coordinated by Focus: Hope; ACCESS; City Year Detroit (AmeriCorps); and other local non-profits, brought Michigan residents together, creating an impressive scene of unity and diversity. With the goal of honoring those lost while moving forward under a united front, we took part in projects such as neighborhood beautification, school preparation and letter writing to American soldiers.

Detroit AIDS Walk – Steppin’ Out

Listening to the advice of AmeriCorps alumi, Team Detroit looked to start early in raising funds for our Long Term Project (LTP).  Detroit AIDS Walk gave us the opportunity to do so, while at the same time helping out the AIDS Walk as well. We took to the streets in an effort to spread the word about the walk, posting ads at various local businesses and talking to residents we passed along the way. The walk also gave us a great platform to raise funds for our team. We created a walk team and raised just under $1000. In addition to this success, on the day of the walk we had the honor of taking part in the unveiling of a panel from the Names Project  AIDS Quilt. This was the second time we were able to pay our respects to those lost to the epidemic and we are thankful for that.

Latino Family Services

With National Latino HIV/AIDS Awareness Day approaching, the team decided to volunteer at Latino Family Services (LFS) (which also serves as a host agency) in the city of Detroit. We assisted LFS in preparing for an upcoming HIV testing event; setting up the testing area, preparing facilities and arranging outreach materials. The event not only offers testing, but also brings awareness to the Latino community, which makes up 4% of the HIV/AIDS cases, but only 3% of the Michigan population.

The year has just started and the experiences we have already encountered will have lasting impact. We look forward to continuing the year and getting things done in Detroit.

Check us out on Facebook for additional pictures, news and updates. https://www.facebook.com/TeamDetroit

Guest Blog: You Talking to Me? A tale of dying in plain sight

by Keith Green, AIDS United Advocate and Director of Federal Affairs with AIDS Foundation of Chicago

At the time that I was diagnosed with HIV, I really didn’t even realize that I was at risk. I was a senior in high school and helped to organize a blood drive as a community service requirement for the Senior Boys Council. My fear of passing out and losing my “cool” status nearly kept me from donating, but my girlfriend convinced me that the really “un-cool” thing to do would be to not lead by example. So, much to my dismay, I gave in. The experience would change my life forever.

My ignorance with respect to risk was mostly related to the fact that I didn’t identify as gay. I’d been dating the same girl on and off throughout my high school years, and several other girls in between. My intimate interactions with a couple of my “boys” were not necessarily what any of us would call “gay.” We all had girlfriends, and just did what we did with one another from time to time. In retrospect, I still wouldn’t call it gay. We were all very clearly bisexual.

In many ways, my HIV diagnosis forced me to assume a gay identity. Upon learning that I was positive I broke up with my girlfriend and have not had any meaningful relationships with women since. My experience is that it is much easier to disclose my HIV status to other gay men than it is to women. Perhaps that’s because, for the past 30 years, HIV has been very much a part of gay culture. Perhaps that’s why, even in 2011, Black men who have sex with men but don’t necessarily identify as gay disassociate themselves from the risks of HIV.

So, as we acknowledge National Gay Men’s HIV/AIDS Awareness Day this year, it is my hope that we’ll keep in mind the diversity within the gay community. Specifically, I hope that we’ll continue to acknowledge the wide range of people whose identities oftentimes get lumped into the classification of gay for the sake of simplification, but don’t recognize their risk as a result. It is my hope that, as an HIV advocacy community, we recognize that identity and behavior are not mutually exclusive, and that there are a host of “gay” men who turn a blind eye to our messaging because they assume that we can’t be talking to them. I was once one of those men, and I’m committed to making sure that other men who look and behave like me don’t make that same mistake!